The US states at the lowest risk of cybercrime

New research has revealed the US states at the lowest risk of cybercrime, with Mississippi coming out on top.

The research by tech experts at WindowsReport.com analysed data from the FBI’s 2022 Internet Crime Report to see which state had the lowest amount of cybercrime victims per 100,000 people.

The study found that residents in Mississippi are at the lowest risk of cybercrime. The 2022 report found 2,043 cybercrime victims last year in the state, around 69 victims per 100,000 people when accounted for population numbers. Total victim losses in 2022 amounted to $28,213,583, a loss of $13,810 per victim on average.

Coming in second place is the state of Kansas, with cybercrime in the state affecting just 82 of every 100,000 people, with 2,399 victims recorded last year. Total losses added up to $58,149,297, an average loss of $24,239 per victim.

Taking third place on the list is the state of North Dakota. The state saw 703 victims of cybercrime in 2022, which is around 92 victims per 100,000 people. Victim losses amounted to $14,279,199, each losing an average of $20,312.

Louisiana comes in fourth place on the list, with 93 cybercrime victims per every 100,000 people and 4,335 victims recorded in 2022. Victim losses added up to $55,696,565 last year, each losing $12,848 to cybercrime on average.

Rounding out the top five is the state of Iowa, which saw the number of cybercrime victims in 2022 sit at 2,959 and comes in fifth place with 94 victims per 100,000 people. Victim losses added up to $42,806,846, with an average loss of $14,467 per victim.

By comparison, residents in Nevada are at the highest risk of cybercrime. The 2022 report found 9,090 cybercrime victims last year in the state, which is around 300 victims per 100,000 people when accounted for population numbers. Total victim losses in 2022 amounted to a massive $127,315,394, a loss of $14,006 per victim on average.

Commenting on the findings, a spokesperson for WindowsReport.com said: “Cybercrime is becoming one of the most common cases of fraud nowadays, and if your state is in this list it doesn’t mean the risk is zero. Doing things like keeping up to date on data breaches, using strong passwords, not trusting unsolicited emails or messages and using an effective anti-virus software can all keep you well protected in the current climate.”

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